Friday, December 2, 2011

Perfect Practice Makes Perfect

A couple days ago I suggested completing a technique-only swim workout, alone and not pace oriented, on a regular basis to teach and reinforce good swimming technique.  Here's a sample of a workout that incorporates many common swimming drills, as well as some drills I've either made up or learned along the way.  A technique swim session does not have to be 4000 scy.  It can be any length you want, as long as the vast majority of swimming done is done with good technique.

5 x 100 - progression through "side work"
  • kick on side with both arms along the torso, switch sides every 12.5 yds (or m.)
  • kick on side with bottom arm extended straight from shoulder toward the wall to which you are heading, switch every 12.5
  • 4 kicks on side, then 1 stroke with top arm (to flip you to the other side), 4 kicks on side, 1 stroke...focus on high elbow for that one stroke
  • 3 kicks on side, 3 strokes starting with top arm (ex. R, L, R to switch sides), 3 kicks on side, 3 strokes starting with top arm (L, R, L)...
  • 3s and 4s: alternate 3 strokes of freestyle with 4 strokes of back (e.x. L, R, L, flip immediately over rotating to your left, R, L, R, L as back, flip immediately over rotating to the your right, R, L, R as free....if you do it right you will be rotating different directions and won't get dizzy)....don't start start stroking until your head flips as well to reinforce your neck being an extension of your spine, and keep your hips high in the water
10 x 25 free style with band, alt fist down, regular back
  • keep the amount of high elbow needed to create an effective catch and propulsive pull in mind to inform the drills after this
20 x 50 - either in rotation or straight through, 4 each of:
  • fist - swim normal stroke but with your fists balled up
  • finger drag - dragging the tips of your fingers along the surface of the water as the arms recovers forward past the head; keep the elbow high (very bent) and the hand loose
  • thumb - swim with the thumb extended out from the hand, perpendicular to the fingers, so that when it hits the hip/upper thigh at the end of each stroke you know you have used the full length of your stroke
  • scull - elbows bent 90 degrees, pointing toward the sky; hands cupped and fingertips pointing to the bottom of the pool; move forearms back and forth from the elbow like a wind-shield wiper motion
  • Distance Per Stroke (DPS) - exaggerate the stroke, minimize resistance to the water, and go as far in the water as you can with each one
4 x 100 - catch-up
  • 2 x hands meet out front before starting the next stroke - can use the exchange of a kick board, pull buoy, or short pipe to keep yourself honest
  • 2 x the forward hands starts to move when the recovering arm passes the ear
5 x 100 - single arm
  • 2 x 50 with pull buoy, non-stroking arm extended straight from the shoulder toward the on-coming wall - first 50 right-arm-only (RA), second 50 left-arm-only (LA)
  • RA with non-stroking arm along the torso, breathing to the stroking arm side
  • LA with non-stroking arm along the torso, breathing to the stroking arm side
  • RA with non-stroking arm along the torso, breathing to the non-stroking side
  • LA with non-stroking arm along the torso, breathing to the non-stroking side
10 x 25 free style with band

8 x 50 FAST with fins on :90 
  • focus on moving the arms through the strokes faster, but without sacrificing a good catch, a high elbow, and a finish past the hip
500 moderate speed, focus on form, bi-lateral (to both sides) breathing

200 c/d

total - 4000 scy/m

When form gets sloppy or focus is lost, stop, even if it's in the middle of an interval.  Rest, and simply start again from where you left off.  Continuing to swim when form is sloppy only reinforces sloppy technique.  Don't waste your own time.

No comments:

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...